Our new Police Commissioner?

GENERAL JOHN GEORGE FIVAZ

 

GeneralGeorgeFivaz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General John George Fivaz joined the South-African Police in 1964 and underwent his basic police training at the Pretoria Police College. His duties over the span of his career include: patrolling, charge office duties, attending to complaints, crime detection, management, work study and police administration. He also commanded various units such as the detective branch in Harrington Street, Cape Town, the South-African Narcotics Bureau (SANAB) branch in Bloemfontein and Efficiency Services at Head Office, Pretoria. At the end of 1976 General Fivaz settled in Pretoria and became a member of the National Inspectorate of the South African Police. He was responsible for restructuring, decentralisation of authority and strategic planning.

In 1995, he was appointed National Commissioner of the South African Police Service by President Nelson Mandela. During this time, he faced the challenge of amalgamating the eleven police agencies of the past into one South African Police Service. He also had to manage the adoption of a new community policing initiative. He was also responsible for transforming the police service into an effective and democratic policing agency for South Africa. Furthermore, he also played a constructive role in the formation of the Southern African Regional Police Chiefs Coordinating Organisation (SARPCCO) in order to enhance co-operation between policing agencies in the Southern African region.

His academic qualifications include a BAdmin degree, which he obtained from the University of the Orange Free State in 1976. Apart from that he is also fully qualified as a work-study officer and police administrator.

Key Current and Former Positions
  • National Commissioner of the South African Police Service
  • George Fivaz retired in January 2000.
Areas of Expertise
  • Policing
  • Transformation
  • Administration
  • Command

More alledged Decree Breaches …….The police cannot say when their investigations will be completed.

Fiji’s Bainimarama accused more decree breaches

Updated at 3:20 pm today

The United Front for a Democratic Fiji says the regime leader, Rear Admiral Frank Bainimarama, has committed further breaches of the Political Parties Decree.

The prime minister is already under police investigation for allegedly breaching that decree as well as a law which, if there is a conviction, can see him jailed and fined as well as disqualified from the election promised for September.

The UFDF says Rear Admiral Bainimarama is now in further breach for claiming to be the first candidate of his proposed party when there is no party structure in place to choose him as a candidate.

It also says by telling the Fiji Sun that election offices will be set up in Savusavu and Taveuni, he has exerted influence on the election office, which is supposed to be independent.

The UFDF has also called on the Chairman of the Media Industry Development Authority, Ashwin Raj, to take immediate steps to stamp out the Fiji Sun’s ongoing daily breaches of the Media Industry Decree.

The police cannot say when their investigations will be completed.

The election supervisor has not commented on the reported breaches of the poll-related decree.

Coalition Government unless a Party gets 51% of the vote.

Allocation of seats in parliament

Fijian Elections Office
Wednesday, April 16, 2014

THE Electoral Commission will allocate seats in the parliament.

According to the Fijian Elections Office, this will be done following the submission of the national results tally by the Elections Supervisor to the commission.

Political parties and independent candidates must win at least 5 per cent of the total vote or they will not be eligible for a seat in parliament.

According to the Elections Office, if a political party clears the 5 per cent threshold, the number of seats it wins will be proportionate to the total number of votes it receives.

For example, if a party wins 60 per cent of the total vote, it will receive roughly 60 per cent of the seats in parliament.

According to the Elections Office, the process involves using a specific mathematical formula to calculate the exact number of seats to award a party based on the number of votes it receives.

Fiji’s formula is one that is used by at least 39 countries around the world, including Australia, Brazil, Denmark, Finland, Israel, Netherlands, and Scotland and Spain

Prime Minister Rear Admiral (Retired) Voreqe Bainimarama tries to backtrack to avoid prosecution for campaigning without first registering his party.

PM: I Am The Only One

SOCIAL WELFARE MINISTER clarifies she has not applied, nor been nominated

Market vendors with the Prime Minister in Savusavu. Photo: Siteri Taleitaki

SITERI TALEITAKI
NASINU
I am the only confirmed candidate in my proposed FijiFirst party at the moment, Prime Minister Rear Admiral (Retired) Voreqe Bainimarama,” told villagers of Nasinu, Vanua Levu, yesterday.
The villagers had asked Mr Bainimarama about the other members of his proposed party, after village headman, Ponipate Savunacagi, had also asked him if the Minister of Social of Welfare, Dr Jiko Luveni, was a confirmed candidate.
The Prime Minister also said Dr Jiko Luveni was used as an example after villagers from Ono-i-Lau had questioned him if members of his Government would be likely candidates for his proposed party.
Also confirming these clarifications was the Minister of Social Welfare herself. Dr Luveni said: “I have not submitted any application nor was nominated. We’ll just have to wait when nominations are done.”
Dr Luveni said she was willing to be a candidate for the proposed party and hopes to carry on the work.
“But I will definitely apply once the party comes into place,” the minister said.
Meanwhile, the Prime Minister said members of his proposed party would be people who were willing to serve the people.
Mr Bainimarama is in Vanua Levu to collect 1000 signatures to help register his proposed FijiFirst Party. As per the Elections Decree, he needs to collect 5000 signatures – 2500 from the Central, 1500 from the West and 1000 from the Northern divisions – to register his proposed party.
Feedback: siteri.taleitaki@fijisun.com.fj

The proposed National Youth Party says it will register on April 25.

The proposed National Youth Party says it will register on April 25. It’s interim leader, Nayagodamu Korovou said they’ve chosen April 25 because this is the time most youths will be in Suva for the Coke games.
He said they have gathered well over 5000 signatures from the different divisions.
“After the declaration of our assets and liabilities, we want to get out there and roll out our manifesto,” Mr Korovou said.
He said: “We believe youths need to be represented well in the new government. When we talk about the future we are talking about our youths. The problem with our youths now is lack of employment and we think it is a direct consequence of the policies made up by former governments.”
He said older political parties have used youth votes to their advantage in the past elections but mostly forget them when they win the elections.
ROSI DOVIVERATA

If convicted, Frank could face up to 10 years in jail and a 27,000 US dollar fine.

Bainimarama probe outcome needs to be announced soon – academic

Updated at 4:31 am today

An academic on Fiji says the outcome of a police investigation against Rear Admiral Frank Bainimarama needs to be announced soon because of its potential implications on the September elections.

The Fiji police have said they are investigating the regime leader for campaigning without having his party registered and displaying an emblem similar to the coat of arms on his campaign bus.

If convicted, he could face up to 10 years in jail and a 27,000 US dollar fine.

An Auckland University academic, Steven Ratuva, says depending on the outcome of the investigation, Rear Admiral Bainimarama may want to defend himself and the case could end up in court.

“It would need to be investigated pretty early, and whatever decision they’re going to make has to be quite early because it has implications in relation to the formation of a new party and also in relation to campaigns before the election.”